Category Archives: Lync

[Tutorial] Configuring Lync Server 2013 to block calls based on Caller ID

Synopsis: Out of the box, Lync Server 2013 does not have any way to block specific calls destined to any user or specific user inside of an organization.  However, Microsoft added in the ability for users/partners/etc. to write custom scripts to help allow flexibility in Lync.  That being said, this tutorial will go over deploying a custom script to allow Lync Server to block calls based on caller ID.

Before we begin, I would like to give credit to a few individuals.  This guide will make use of David Paulino’s guide/script for Lync Server 2013 (http://uclobby.com/2014/07/31/calleridblock/), which was a converted script from VoIP Norm’s original Lync Server 2010 script (http://voipnorm.blogspot.co.uk/2011/06/blocking-calls-in-lync-based-on-caller.html).  The only changes in this article is a more step-by-step deployment guide as well as the ability to control blocking of numbers at a user level and the ability to optionally leave comments on why a rule was added.

Tutorial

  1. Download a copy of the CallerIDBlock.am.txt script (or copy and paste this script into a file called CallerIDBlock.am) (if you downloaded this file, make sure you remove the .txt at the end)
    1. <?xml version="1.0" ?>
      <lc:applicationManifest
      lc:appUri="http://jackstromberg.com/2015/02/CallerIDBlock"
      xmlns:lc="http://schemas.microsoft.com/lcs/2006/05">
      <lc:requestFilter methodNames="ALL" strictRoute="true"/>
      <lc:responseFilter reasonCodes="NONE"/>
      <lc:scriptOnly/>
      <lc:file name="BlockedTelephoneNumbers"
      path="\\<Lync Share Path>\CallerIDBlock\BlockedTelephoneNumbers.txt"
      delimitedBy="comma"
      keyColumnName="FromSIP"
      static="false">
      <lc:column name="FromSIP" />
      <lc:column name="ToSIP" />
      <lc:column name="Action" />
      <lc:column name="Comments" />
      </lc:file>
      <lc:splScript><![CDATA[
      /*
      Module Name: CallerIDBlock.am
      */if(sipRequest.Method == “INVITE”){
      fromSIPUser = GetUserName(GetUri(sipRequest.From));
      toSIPUser = GetUserName(GetUri(sipRequest.To));
      sep = IndexOfString(fromSIPUser, “;”);Log (“Debugr”, false, “CallerIDBlock processing request:”);
      Log (“Debugr”, false, “From – “, fromSIPUser);
      Log (“Debugr”, false, “To – “, toSIPUser);
      if(sep != -1) {
      fromSIPUser = SubString(fromSIPUser, 0, sep);
      }

      action = BlockedTelephoneNumbers[fromSIPUser].Action;
      if(action == “block”) {
      if(BlockedTelephoneNumbers[fromSIPUser].ToSIP == “*” || BlockedTelephoneNumbers[fromSIPUser].ToSIP == toSIPUser){
      Log (“Debugr”, false, “Rejected by CallerIDBlock”);
      Respond(403, “Forbidden”);
      }
      } else {
      Log (“Debugr”, false, “Allowed by CallerIDBlock”);
      }
      }
      return;
      ]]></lc:splScript>
      </lc:applicationManifest>

  2. Download a copy of the BlockedTelephoneNumbers.txt file (or copy and paste the code below into a file called BlockedTelephoneNumbers.txt)
    1. FromSIP,ToSIP,Action,Comments
  3. Edit the CallerIDBlock.am file and change the BlockedTelephoneNumbers path to be your fileshare
    CallerIDBlock - LyncPath - Notepad
  4. Edit the list of blocked numbers inside the BlockedTelephoneNumbers.txt file
    1. Notes: The FromSIP address is the Caller ID of the incoming call; the ToSIP is the individual that is trying to be reached (side-note, in this particular script, if you set this field so an asterisk (*), this will be a wildcard for any/every user; the Action should be set to “block” to block the call; the Comments field is an optional field to document when/why the number was added to be blocked
      BlockedTelephoneNumbers Example
  5. Create a new folder where your Lync share is
    LyncShare - CallerIDBlock
  6. Copy the CallerIDBlock.am and BlcokedTelephoneNumbers.txt files to your Lync Share where your new CallerIDBlock folder is
    LyncShare - CallerIDBlock - Script and Numbers
  7. Add the CallerIDBlock script as a Lync Server Application
    1. Open up the Lync Server Manage Shell as an Administrator
      Lync Server Management Shell - Run as administrator
    2. New-CsServerApplication -Identity “Service:Registrar:<Lync Front End Pool>/CallerIDBlock” -Uri http://jackstromberg.com/2015/02/CallerIDBlock -Critical $false -ScriptName “\\<Lync Share Path>\CallerIDBlock\CallerIDBlock.am”
      New-CsServerApplication -Identity CallerIDBlock
  8. Enable the CallerIDBlockLync Server Application
    1. Set-CsServerApplication -Identity “Service:Registrar:<Lync Front End Pool>/CallerIDBlock” -Enabled $true
      Set-CsServerApplication -Identity CallerIDBlock
  9. Verify the script is actively listening for calls
    1. Open up Event Viewer, navigate to Applications and Services Logs, Lync Server, and verify you see Event ID 30208
      Event Viewer - Applications and Services Logs - Lync Server - Event ID 30208

How to administratively forward Lync calls or numbers

Scenario: A user leaves the organization and you would like to forward their number/calls to a manager.

Solution: Microsoft has a Lync Server 2013 (and 2010) Resource Kit that contains a command-line tool called SEFAUtil (secondary extension feature activation) which can be used to achieve this task.  Before beginning, I would recommend taking a look at the official TechNet article/documentation on the utility itself: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj945604.aspx  In this tutorial, we will download the tool and execute the proper commands to configure call forwarding for a specified user.

  1. Download a copy of the Lync Server 2013 Resource Kit from Microsoft’s website here: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/p/?LinkID=330429
  2. Run the installer from your Front End Server/Pool
    OCSReskit_msi
    Lync Server 2013 - Resource Kit - Welcome
    Lync Server 2013 - Resource Kit - EULA
    Lync Server 2013 - Resource Kit - Destination Folder
    Lync Server 2013 - Resource Kit - Install
    Lync Server 2013 - Resource Kit - Finish
  3. Create a trusted application pool
    1. Execute the following command
      1. $Site=Get-CsSite -Identity “My Site
        Lync Server 2013 - Get-CsSite - Variable

        1. Note: If you don’t know what to substitute for My Site, execute the following command to see what sites you have available and then use the Identity value.
          1. Get-CsSite
            Lync Server 2013 - Get-CsSite
      2. Execute the following command
        1. New-CsTrustedApplicationPool -id <Pool FQDN> -Registrar <Pool Registrar FQDN> -site $Site.SiteID
          Lync Server 2013 - New-CsTrustedApplicationPool

          1. Note: Technically we didn’t need to run the 1st command, however this can help cut-down on user error.  Additionally, if you have multiple sites and you knew what site you wanted to use but not the ID, this helps skip a step.
  4. Define SEFAUtil as a trusted application in the Lync topology
    1. Execute the following command
      1. New-CsTrustedApplication -ApplicationId sefautil -TrustedApplicationPoolFqdn <Pool FQDN> -Port 7489
        Lync Server 2013 - New-CsTrustedApplication sefautil
  5. Enable the Lync topology to commit the changes
    1. Enable-CsTopology
      Lync Server 2013 - New-CsTrustedApplication sefautil - Enable-CsTopology
  6. Forward a user’s number
    1. Navigate to %ProgramFiles%\Microsoft Lync Server 2013\ResKit
      Lync Server 2013 - Navigate ResKit
    2. Execute the following command
      1. SEFAUtil.exe /Server:<Pool FQDN> [email protected] /enablefwdimmediate /setfwddestination:[email protected]
        SEFAUtil enablefwdimmediate setfwddestination

That should be it!

Note: If you are more comfortable using a GUI or don’t wish to type in multiple powershell commands, I would highly recommend checking out Johan Veldhuis’s SefaUtil GUI PowerShell script.  Once you are done following steps 1-5 above, you you can grab a copy of the script here: http://johanveldhuis.nl/sefautil-gui/sefautil-gui/

[Tutorial] Deploying a reverse proxy for Lync Server 2013

In this tutorial we will go over deploying a reverse proxy for Lync Server 2013.  The original method for deploying a reverse proxy was to use Microsoft’s product ForeFront TMG (Threat Management Gateway), however shortly after the release of Lync Server 2013, TMG was discontinued.  In turn, a few tutorials have popped up on how to achieve this using Apache and IIS, but there wasn’t an official recommendation on what to use until Server 2012 was released.

Per Microsoft’s documentation, we can use IIS with an additional extension called Application Request Routing to achieve this task: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/gg398069.aspx

Details on the IIS Application and Request Routing extension can be found here: http://www.iis.net/downloads/microsoft/application-request-routing

Side note, much of this guide is largely based on an older technet article published here, which has some additional fine details on how exactly IIS is working to proxy the requests: http://blogs.technet.com/b/nexthop/archive/2013/02/19/using-iis-arr-as-a-reverse-proxy-for-lync-server-2013.aspx

This tutorial will go over installation instructions from start to finish for Server 2012 and Server 2012 R2.  I have attached the links on how to get Server 2008 and Server 2008 R2 prepped, so you can continue the tutorial once the IIS Application Request Routing extension has been installed.

Download Prerequisite Software

  1. Windows Server 2012 R2
    1. Download IIS Application Request Routing (ARR): http://www.microsoft.com/web/gallery/install.aspx?appid=ARRv3_0
  2. Windows Server 2012
    1. Download (don’t install yet) Hotfix for Microsoft Application Request Routing Version 2.5 for IIS7 (KB 2732764) (x64)
    2. Download IIS Application Request Routing (ARR): http://www.microsoft.com/web/gallery/install.aspx?appid=ARRv2_5
  3. Windows Server 2008 and 2008 R2
    1. Ensure you have IIS v7.X installed; instructions on how to do this can be found here: http://www.iis.net/learn/install/installing-iis-7/installing-iis-7-and-above-on-windows-server-2008-or-windows-server-2008-r2
    2. Install Application Request Routing version 2
      1. Instructions can be found here: http://www.iis.net/learn/extensions/installing-application-request-routing-(arr)/install-application-request-routing-version-2

Install IIS for Server 2012 and Server 2012 R2

  1. Please follow my tutorial here: http://jackstromberg.com/2014/11/tutorial-how-to-install-iis-on-server-2012-and-server-2012-r2/

Installing IIS Application Request Routing (ARR) 3

  1. Run the ARRv3_0.exe application as an administrator
    ARRv3_0 - Run as administrator
  2. Click Install
    Web Platform Installer 5.0 - Aplication Request Routing 3.0 - Cart

    1. Note:  The cart for the v3.0 installer is shown above.  If you are running version 2.5, you will see 2 items needed for install.  Version 3, only needs one.  This is okay.
      Web Platform Installer 5.0 - Aplication Request Routing 2.5 - Cart
  3. Click I Accept
    Web Platform Installer 5.0 - Aplication Request Routing 3.0 - I Accept
  4. Click Finish
    Web Platform Installer 5.0 - Aplication Request Routing 3.0 - Finish
  5. Click Exit
    Web Platform Installer 5.0 - Aplication Request Routing 3.0 - Exit

Configuring IIS for SSL

  1. Open up Internet Information Services (IIS) Manager
    Server Manager - Tools - Internet Information Services IIS Manager
  2. Select your server and double click on Server Certificates
    LyncRP - Internet Information Services IIS Manager - Home - Server Certificates
  3. Generate or Import your SSL Certificate trusted by a public CA (VeriSign, GoDaddy, etc.)
    1. Note: Generation of this certificate is outside the scope of this tutorial.  This SSL certificate should be the UCC certificate that allows for SAN addresses such aslync, meet, dialin, lyncdiscover, etc.
      LyncRP - Internet Information Services IIS Manager - Server Certificates
  4. Expand your server, expand Sites, select Default Web Site, select Bindings…
    LyncRP - Internet Information Services IIS Manager - Sites - Default Web Site - Bindings
  5. Click on Add…
    LyncRP - Internet Information Services IIS Manager - Sites - Default Web Site - Bindings - Add
  6. Select https, and choose your SSL certificate you imported in the previous step, click OK
    LyncRP - Internet Information Services IIS Manager - Sites - Default Web Site - Bindings - Add - https
  7. Click Close
    LyncRP - Internet Information Services IIS Manager - Sites - Default Web Site - Bindings - Add - Close

Create Server Farms

  1. Select Server Farms and then click on Create Server Farm…
    LyncRP - Internet Information Services IIS Manager - Server Farms - Create Server Farm
  2. Enter in the Server farm name and click Next
    1. Note: We will end up creating farm names for each externally published URL.  This can be lync, dialin, meet, etc, order will not matter. For the sake of this tutorial, I am going to use lync first.
      LyncRP - Internet Information Services IIS Manager - Server Farms - Create Server Farm - Server Farm Name
  3. Enter the Server address (same as farm name before), click Advanced Settings…, expand applicationRequestRouting
    LyncRP - Internet Information Services IIS Manager - Server Farms - Create Server Farm - Add Server
  4. Change the httpPort to 8080 and httpsPort to 4443 and click Add
    LyncRP - Internet Information Services IIS Manager - Server Farms - Create Server Farm - Add Server - applicationRequestRouting Ports
  5. Click Finish
    LyncRP - Internet Information Services IIS Manager - Server Farms - Create Server Farm - Add Server - applicationRequestRouting Ports - Finish
  6. Click Yes on the Rewrite Rules dialog
    LyncRP - Internet Information Services IIS Manager - Server Farms - Create Server Farm - Add Server - applicationRequestRouting Ports - Finish - Rewrite Rules Dialog
  7. Repeat steps 1-6 for dialin, meet, and lyncdiscover
    LyncRP - Internet Information Services IIS Manager - Server Farms - meet-dialin-lyncdiscver
  8. For your Lync Web Apps server (lyncwac), continue repeat steps 1-6, however ensure you use ports 80 and 443 instead of 8080 and 4443.  This is needed to communicate properly with the WAC server.
    LyncRP - Internet Information Services IIS Manager - Server Farms - Create Server Farm - Add Server - lyncwacLyncRP - Internet Information Services IIS Manager - Server Farms - meet-dialin-lyncdiscver-lyncwac

Configure IIS Caching, Proxy Timeouts, and Routing Rules

For each of the server farms we created, repeat the following steps:

  1. Select a Server Farm and double click on Caching
    LyncRP - Internet Information Services IIS Manager - Server Farms - Caching
  2. Uncheck Enable disk cache and click Apply
    LyncRP - Internet Information Services IIS Manager - Server Farms - Caching - Uncheck Enable disk cache
  3. Select the same Server Farm object and double click on Proxy
    LyncRP - Internet Information Services IIS Manager - Server Farms - Proxy
  4. Change the Time-out (seconds) from 30 seconds to 600 and click Apply
    1. Note: This is needed to prevent the Lync Web Apps server from timing out unexpectedly.  Microsoft recommends this setting to be 200, but this isn’t long enough for iOS clients.  Increasing this to 600 will fix the issue where iOS clients prompt with the following error message “Your server configuration has changed. Please restart Lync.”.LyncRP - Internet Information Services IIS Manager - Server Farms - Proxy - Time-out 200
  5. Select the same Server Farm object and double click on Routing Rules
    LyncRP - Internet Information Services IIS Manager - Server Farms - Routing Rules
  6. Uncheck Enable SSL offloading and click Apply
    LyncRP - Internet Information Services IIS Manager - Server Farms - Routing Rules - Uncheck Enable SSL offloading

Configure IIS URL Rewrites

  1.  Select your IIS Server and double click on URL Rewrite
    LyncRP - Internet Information Services IIS Manager - URL Rewrite
  2. Go through and Remove all of the non _SSL Inbound Rules
    LyncRP - Internet Information Services IIS Manager - URL Rewrite - Remove - Non-SSL
    The result should look like this:
    LyncRP - Internet Information Services IIS Manager - URL Rewrite - Remove - Non-SSL - Removed
  3. Select a rule and click on Add… underneath the Conditions actions pane
    LyncRP - Internet Information Services IIS Manager - URL Rewrite - Add
  4. Enter {HTTP_HOST} for the Condition input and enter role.* for your Pattern
    1. Where role is meet, dialin, lyncdiscover, etc.
      LyncRP - Internet Information Services IIS Manager - URL Rewrite - Add - HTTP_HOST
  5. Repeat steps 3-4 for each SSL rule for a result like this
    LyncRP - Internet Information Services IIS Manager - URL Rewrite - Rules

That should be it! 🙂

Configure call forwarding on unassigned number ranges in Lync

One of the new features introduced in Lync Server 2010 and kept in 2013 is the ability to assign a block of numbers to Lync and have Lync handle a call made to an unassigned number a specific way rather than just have a fast-busy signal.

While it is easy to configure a call to be handled by a simple announcement (a sound file saying you have reached a number that has not been assigned to an individual at your corporation or a text-to-speech version translated by Lync), there is really no easy way to configure the call to be routed a specific way via the CSCP (Lync GUI control panel).  In this tutorial, we will cover some of the powershell commands to create an announcement to forward the call to an operator or response group and then assign the announcement to an unassigned number range.

  1. Open up the Lync Server Management Shell as an administrator on one of your Front End servers
    Lync Server Management Shell - Run as administrator
    Lync Server Management Shell - Running as Administrator
  2. Execute the following powershell command to configure how the call should be handled
    1. To route to a response group or user
      New-CsAnnouncement -Identity ApplicationServer:lyncpool.mydomain.com -Name “Forward Announcement” -TextToSpeechPrompt “Thank you for calling my company, please wait while we redirect your call.” -Language “en-US” -TargetUri sip:[email protected]
    2. To route to a specific phone number (make sure you specify ;user=phone)
      New-CsAnnouncement -Identity ApplicationServer:lyncpool.mydomain.com -Name “Forward Announcement” -TextToSpeechPrompt “Thank you for calling my company, please wait while we redirect your call.” -Language “en-US” -TargetUri “sip:+[email protected];user=phone”
    3. Alternatively, you can use your own recording in a .wav format rather than use the robotic Lync voice by specifying using either of the following commands:
      New-CsAnnouncement -Identity ApplicationServer:lyncpool.mydomain.com -Name “Forward Announcement” -AudioFilePrompt “WelcomeMessage.wav” -TargetUri sip:[email protected]
      New-CsAnnouncement -Identity ApplicationServer:lyncpool.mydomain.com -Name “Forward Announcement” -AudioFilePrompt “WelcomeMessage.wav” -TargetUri “sip:+[email protected];user=phone”
      New-CsAnnouncement -TextToSpeech - forward to user
  3. Execute the following powershell command to create the unassigned number range and assign our announcement/forward to the unassigned number range
    1. New-CsUnassignedNumber -Identity “Unassigned Number Range” -NumberRangeStart “+15555555000” -NumberRangeEnd “+15555559000” -AnnouncementName “Forward Announcement” -AnnouncementService ApplicationServer:lyncpool.mydomain.com
      New-CsUnassignedNumber Range - Forward Annoucnement
  4. At this point, once you call a number that has not been assigned to a response group, user, dial-in access number, etc in the 15555555000-9000 range, you should receive your message and in my particiular case, the call should be forwarded to a particular user.  Hope this helps!

Notes: Official technet article on how the New-CsAnnouncement command can be found here: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/gg398522.aspx

[Error] Enable-CsUser : Specified SIP domain is not vaild. Specify a valid SIP domain and then try again.

Issue: When trying to enable a new user for Lync, you receive the following error; both within PowerShell and the Web GUI.

Enable-CsUser : Specified SIP domain is not vaild. Specify a valid SIP domain and then try again.
Specified SIP domain is not valid - cscp

When executing: Enable-CsUser -Identity “DOMAIN\Jack.Stromberg.Admin” -RegistrarPool “lyncpool.mydomain.local” -SipAddressType “emailaddress” -SipDomain “mydomain.com”
Specified SIP domain is not valid - lync server management shell

Solution: Most of the time this turns out to be a typo in the -SipDomain parameter or the user’s email address set inside of Active Directory.  Once you verify that you do not have any typos in the user’s email address/SipDomain parameter, the user should be able to be added successfully.  If neither work, you can specify the SipAddressType to be the user’s SamAccountName rather than email address.

Lync call – error ID 52063 (source ID 242)

Symptom: You receive the following error when trying to place a Lync call to someone.

Call was not completed or has ended.

When contacting your support team, reference error ID 52063 (source ID 242).

Troubleshooting information is available online, including best practices for using Lync.

Lync error ID 52063 source ID 242

Solution: This turned out to be an issue where the call was unable to be completed due to the following issues.

  1. The Lync client was unresponsive/could not answer an audio call
  2. The Lync user was not configured for the call to be transferred to voicemail

Please make sure that the Lync client can successfully answer calls or that the user has voicemail configured in the event the Lync client cannot answer a call.

Export a list of numbers used in Lync Server 2013

Today I was curious how many numbers we have used up on our DID block and wanted to pull a report specifying which numbers were allocated to which user, conference room, etc.  After a quick Google search, I came accross a powershell script by Lasse Nordvik Wedø.  Attached below is a copy of his powershell script with a few modifications by me to pull a couple of extra attributes about the user from Active Directory.  Please make sure to drop him a comment on his blog, located here: http://tech.rundtomrundt.com/2012/04/listing-all-deployed-numbers-in-lync.html

The following list of numbers will be generated to a .htm web report:

  • Users enabled in Lync without a number assigned
  • Users with a number assigned to them
  • Users with a private line
  • Analog devices
  • Common Area Phone Numbers
  • Response Group Numbers
  • Meeting (dialin) numbers
  • Exchange Objects
  • Application endpoints with a LineURI

The script can be downloaded here (make sure to remove the .txt extension once you have downloaded it): Assigned_numbers.ps1

Here is an image of executing the powershell script:
Assigned Numbers

Here is an image of the result (webpage):
Assigned Numbers Webpage

Here is an image of what the htm file looks like when you open it up:
Assigned Numbers Results

Additionally, if you are looking for a complete resource of different attributes you can pull from the Get-ADUser command, see the following technet article: http://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/12037.active-directory-get-aduser-default-and-extended-properties.aspx

How to federate with AOL via Lync

Since Microsoft announced they would be retiring their PIC (Public IM Connectivity) service, the ability to federate with AOL will soon cease to exist.  Interestingly though, AOL has made a public statement saying they will now support direct federation with Lync customers.

AOL is pleased to offer Microsoft Lync customers the opportunity to continue their current federation with AIM and establish new federations if needed. For the first time, we are enabling companies with the ability to establish a direct relationship with AOL to provision and manage their connectivity to the AIM network. This will also allow you to have direct and immediate access to AIM technical support engineers who can quickly identify and resolve any AIM-related issues, thus making the transition to AOL is seamless with no disruption to your company and users.

More details can be found on their website as well as an application to enable direct federation here: http://aimenterprise.aol.com/pic.php

 

Lync Persistent Chat Error – User is not sip-enabled

Symptom: When you try to create a new chatroom from the Lync 2010/2013 client, you are redirected to a webpage that shows the following error:

User is not sip-enabled.

User is not sip-enabled

 

Solution: Turns out this is an issue with cross-compatibility between Single-sign on and 3rd party browsers.  Make sure you are using Internet Explorer and you should be able to login and manage your persistent chatroooms.

[Tutorial] Setting up and installing persistent chat for Lync Server 2013

Here is how to configure persistent chat for your Lync 2013 deployment.

  1. Login to your Lync Front End Server and start the Lync Server Topology Builder
  2. When the Topology Builder window opens, select Download Topology from existing deployment and select OK
    Download Topology from existing deployment
  3. Save the file to your desktop
    Save current topology
  4. Expand Lync Server -> Your Site -> Lync Server 2013 -> Persistent Chat pools
  5. Right click Persistent Chat pools and select New Persistent Chat Pool…
    Create new persistent chat pool
  6. On the Define the fully qualified domain name (FQDN) page, enter the FQDN your standard front end server and check Single computer pool.  If you want to deploy a highly available environment for persistent chat, you will need to deploy 2 new machines to put into a persistent chat pool and check Multiple computer pool.  It is not supported by Microsoft at this time to collocate the persistent chat service on the same machines in an enterprise front end pool.  Once done, click Next.
    Define New Persistent Chat Pool

    1. In this tutorial, I am going to go over deploying persistent chat in a highly available environment.
  7. If you clicked on Multiple computer pool, enter in the machine names where the persistent chat service will be installed, and click Next.
    Define computers in persistent chat pool
  8. On the Define properties of the Persistent Chat pool page, enter in the Display name of the Persistent Chat pool (you can name this whatever you would like to) and click Next
    Define properties of the persistent chat pool
  9. Select the SQL Server store you wish to use and select Next
    Define SQL Server Store for the persistent chat pool
  10. Select or create a new file store and click Next
    Define the file store for the persistent chat pool
  11. Select the Front End pool/server as the next hop pool and click Finish
    Define the next hop server for the persistent chat pool
  12. Once done with the Persistent Chat wizard, right click on Lync Server in the Topology Builder and select Publish Topology…
    Publish the Topology
  13. Click Next on the Publish the topology window
    Publish the Topology Wizard
  14. Click Next on the Create databases screen
    Publish the Topology Wizard - Create databases
  15. Click Finish once the topology has been published
    Publish the Topology - complete
  16. Complete the following steps on each of the Persistent Chat servers you created
    1. Login to the server that will be running the persistent chat service
    2. Copy/mount the Lync Server 2013 installation media
    3. Run the setup.exe program from the Lync Server 2013 installation media
      Lync Server 2013 Installation Media - Setup
    4. Click Yes on the “In order to run the software on this CD, the Microsoft Visual C++ 2012 x64 Minimum Runtime – 11.0.50727 Package must be installed.” Dialog box.
      Lync Server 2013 Visual C++ Library
    5. Click Install on the Microsoft Lync Server 2013 dialog box
      Lync Server 2013 Installation Path
    6. Check I accept the terms in the license agreement and click OK
      Lync Server 2013 Installation EULA
    7. Once installed, click on Install or Update Lync Server System
      Lync Server 2013 - Install or Update Lync Server System
    8. Click Run next to Step 1: Install Local Configuration Store
      Lync Server 2013 - Step 1
    9. Check Retrieve directly from the Central Management store and click Next
      Lync Server 2013 - Retrieve Central Management Store
    10. Click Finish once the installation has completed.
      (oops, no picture for this one :()
    11. Click Run next to Step 2: Setup or Remove Lync Server Components
      Run Step 2 Setup or Remove Lync Server Components
    12. Click Next
      Set up Lync Server Components
    13. Click Finish
      Set up Lync Server Components - Finish
    14. Click Run next to Step 3: Request, Install or Assign Certificates
      Step 3 - Request, Install or Assign Certificates
    15. Click Request on the Certificate Wizard screen
      Certificate Wizard - Request
    16. Check Send the request immediately to an online certification authority and hit Next
      Certificate Request - Send the request immediately to an online certification authority
    17. Click Next on the Certification Authority (CA) page
      Certificate Request - Choose a certification authority
    18. Click Next on the Certification Authority Account page
      Certificate Request - Certification Authority Account
    19. Click Next on the Specify Alternate Certificate Template page
      Certificate Request - Specify Alternate Certificate Template
    20. Type in a Friendly name for the certificate (I would just use whatever you used for the Persistent Chat Pool Display Name) and click Next
      Certificate Request - Name and Security Settings

      1. NOTE: If you are deploying multiple servers in the Lync Persistent Chat Pool, make sure to check the Mark the certificate’s private key as exportable box.
    21. Enter in your Organization and Organizational Unit and hit Next
      Certificate Request - Organization Information
    22. Enter in your Country/Region, State/Province, City/Locality, and hit Next
      Certificate Request - Geographical Information
    23. Hit Next on the Subject Name / Subject Alternative Names screen
      Certificate Request - Subject Name - Subject Alternative Names
    24. Hit Next on the Configure Additional Subject Alternative Names screen
      Certificate Request - Configure Additional Subject Alternative Names
    25. Hit Next on the Certificate Request Summary page
      Certificate Request - Summary
    26. Hit Next once the certificate request process has finished executing commands
      Certificate Request - Executing Commands
    27. Hit Finish on the Online Certificate Request Status screen
      Certificate Request - Online Certificate Request Status
    28. Hit Next on the Certificate Assignment screen
      Certificate Assignment
    29. Hit Next on the Certificate Assignment Summary screen
      Certificate Assignment - Summary
    30. Hit Finish on the Executing Commands screen
      Certificate Assignment - Executing Commands
    31. Close the Certificate Wizard screen
      Certificate Wizard
    32. Click Run next to Step 4: Start Services
      Step 4 - Start Services
    33. Click Next on the Start Services screen
      Start Services Wizard
    34. Click Finish on the Executing Commands screen
      Start Services Wizard - Finish
    35. Click Run next to Service Status (Optional)
      Step 4 - Start Services
    36. Scroll through the list of services and find Lync Server Persistent Chat and verify it is Running.
      Services - Lync Server Persistent Chat
  17. At this point of the deployment, the infrastructure should be in place to actually push Persistent Chat out to your clients.  Next we will create a test group.
  18. Login to the Lync Admin Panel (Cscp)
  19. Select the Persistent Chat tab
    cscp - Persistent Chat
  20. Click New and select your persistent chat pool and click OK
    cscp - Persistent Chat - Select a Service
  21. Type in a Name for your persistent chat category and select who can have access to the category.  This category will be the container that holds a set of chatrooms.  Click Commit when finished.
    cscp - Persistent Chat - New Category
  22. Next, select the Persistent Chat Policy tab and double click on the Global policy.
    cscp - Persistent Chat - Persistent Chat Policy
  23. Check Enable Persistent Chat and click Commit
    cscp - Persistent Chat - Edit Global Policy
  24. Next, we need to create the actual chatroom.  This step needs to be done via PowerShell, so open up the Lync Server Management Console.
    Lync Server Management Console
  25. Execute the following command
    New-CsPersistentChatRoom -Name “My test chatroom” -Category “Test Category
    Lync Server Management Console - New-CsPersistentChatRoom
  26. Next, we will assign a user to the chatroom, so execute the following command:
    Set-CsPersistentChatRoom -Identity “My test chatroom” -members @{Add=”sip:[email protected]“}
    Lync Server Management Console - Set-CsPersistentChatRoom
  27. Now, we are ready to join our test chatroom.  First, close your Lync client if it is already running.
    Lync 2013 Client - File - Exit
  28. Relaunch Lync, and you should see the persistent chatroom icon.
    Persistent Chat - Chatrooms
  29. Double click on the chatroom and try sending a message.
    Persistent Chat - Hello World
  30. Congrats!  If you have made it to this point, you should now be able to offer a new collaborative feature to your users at your organization! 🙂